Grinder and Coola Emerge From Hibernation

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A sure sign that spring has officially arrived at the Peak of Vancouver, our resident Grizzlies Grinder and Coola have excitedly emerged from hibernation this morning. This was the bears’ 16th hibernation period and the second longest since their arrival at the Grouse Mountain Refuge for Endangered Wildlife. Grinder and Coola’s habitat will be strategically expanded over the next while, emulating the experience in the wild, where Grizzly bears gradually increase their footprint within a territory. 

Grinder and Coola turned 16 this past winter. Both male Grizzlies were orphaned in separate incidents and brought to Grouse Mountain as their last viable option. The bears are an important part of the Grouse Mountain family and give our guests an opportunity to learn more about British Columbia’s wildlife. 
Guests to the Mountain can visit Grinder and Coola at their habitat daily. The bears will choose to continue to spend some time in their den, and some time outside with warmer temperatures and longer daylight hours to come, so the next time you visit Grouse Mountain, be sure to stop by their habitat and say hello.

Not the first Parahawking bird but the first really good one….

Not the first Parahawking bird but the first really good one. This is Brad the Black Kite wearing his hood sporting the @gingliders logo. The hood is designed to keep the birds calm and free from distractions, much like blinkers on a horse. When the birds are ready to fly, the hood is removed. Would you like to see your logo on our Parahawking equipment? Go to bit.ly/sponsorparahawking to find out how. #parahawking #sponsor #sponsorship #exposure #branding #advertising #gingliders

Earth Day 2017

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Happy Earth Day! Today we celebrate our beautiful planet Earth.

It’s a great day to get out and acknowledge the beauty of nature as well as think about what actions we can take in our everyday lives to conserve that beauty.
At Grouse Mountain, we are working towards reducing our own environmental footprint. While it’s an ongoing journey, here are some of the steps we’re taking to operate more sustainably and help conserve our natural environment:
  • Grouse Mountain is serviced by two public transit routes with regular service running to and from the base every half hour. 

  • We run a complimentary shuttle from Downtown Vancouver during the summer and along Nancy Greene Way during busy periods in the winter. 


  • We installed a Leviton electric vehicle charging station in 2013 that electric car users with a ChargePass can access. 


  • We offer designated parking spots for the majority of the region’s major car-sharing options (Zipcar, EVO and Modo). 


  • For bike enthusiasts (fit enough to make the trek up Nancy Greene Way!), we also provide bike racks located at the base. 


  • The Skyride offers low impact transportation to the mountaintop and has eliminated over 25 million drives to the top of the Mountain plus it can actually supply power back to the grid on trips when the downhill car is heavier than the uphill car!


  • The Observatory and Altitudes Bistro are members of the Green Table Network, a group committed to responsible restaurant practices, as well as Ocean Wise, the Vancouver Aquarium’s conservation program. 


  • We work with local growers and suppliers to shorten the distance in our product sourcing and provide fresher seasonal offerings in our restaurants.


  • We source some ingredients from our very own gardens on the Mountain and are planning to expand our growing program.


  • Our Bee Hive Program launched in 2015 and is working to grow and strengthen bee colonies and to responsibly harvest honey to use within our food and beverage operation.


  • Over 15,000 school children participate in Grouse Mountain’s Adventures in Education Programs every year. Through these programs we aim to create awareness amongst today’s youth about their environment, surrounding wildlife and the many things they can do to sustain and support both.

  • The Pollinators Garden was started to showcase regional varietals that are important in supplying a source of pollen to both our bees and a broad range of wild pollinators.

  • We have participated in the North American Hummingbird Banding Program for over 10 years and our collected data is compiled with data from other stations for research on hummingbird populations and migration in Western North America.

Earth Week Update: Natural Environment

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At Grouse Mountain our Refuge for Endangered Wildlife sits at the heart of our mountaintop. Our connection to the natural environment is essential in everything we do and we strive to showcase the best of British Columbia including its wild spaces and species. 

It’s only natural then that we’ve come to incorporate programs that reflect and extend this connection. Our Pollinators Garden, participation the North American Hummingbird Banding Program and support of the Northern Spotted Owl captive breeding program are just a handful of examples. 
The Pollinators Garden was started at Grouse Mountain as a natural extension of our Bee Hive Program. Both educational and beautiful, the garden showcases regional varietals that are important in supplying a source of pollen to both our bees and a broad range of wild pollinators. 
As participants of the North American Hummingbird Banding Program for over 10 years, our collected data is compiled with data from other stations for research on hummingbird populations and migration in Western North America. This collection of data has led to interesting findings about hummingbirds in a sub-alpine environment. 
Ensuring that not just these, but all wildlife that inhabit the Coast Mountain range continue to have a home is important to ensure the longevity and diversity of the ecosystem.

Earth Week Update: Education

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Grouse Mountain is an amazing place. It provides access and insight into BC’s wilderness, culture and way of life. Keeping that naturalness and beauty is something we care about greatly. Leading up to Earth Day 2017 we want to share with you some of the ways we’re working to be more sustainable. While our journey is ongoing and there are always ways to improve, here’s a look at some of the steps we’re taking towards reducing our environmental footprint.

As Earth Day approaches, conversations about sustainability and the environment come to the forefront. But, we believe there are opportunities for those conversations to take place every day. 

Being located so close to the City yet on the edge of the wilderness and welcoming over 1.3 million visitors a year, Grouse Mountain is in a unique position to inspire conversations about sustainability and ways that collectively we can work to reduced our impact on the planet. 
Education is an important foundation for sustainability. Over 15,000 school children participate in Grouse Mountain’s Adventures in Education Programs every year. Through these programs we aim to create awareness amongst today’s youth about their environment, surrounding wildlife and the many things they can do to sustain and support both. 
In addition to more formal education programs, just sharing our natural spaces with visitors can inspire a greater appreciation for the environment. There are opportunities for all visitors to learn something about our uniquely British Columbian flora and fauna. Learn about the hibernation habits of Grizzly bears from a Ranger Talk at our Refuge for Endangered Wildlife or venture into the forest on a Guided Eco-Walk.
Our hope is for visitors to leave Grouse Mountain with a greater appreciation for the beauty of our natural environment and for that appreciation to help stimulate conversations about what we can do to protect it.